Happy New Year from Jerusalem

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The Jewish New Year starts at sunset Wednesday. Life in Israel is slowing down as we head toward the holiest day on the Jewish calendar — the Day of Atonement. I hope to write on that next week. This week, because of some busyness in my head and my life — I will let Koinoia House (a ministry of Chuck Missler) tell you about ‘the Head of the Year’, also called the Feast of the Blast or Feast of Trumpets.

For all the faults of the Jewish people, they are God’s chosen and they have God’s time clock. In Leviticus 23:4 we are told “these are the feasts of the LORD.” Not of Israel. Not of the Jews. Of YHWH. If we gentile believers are grafted into Israel by trusting in His Messiah, if we are made sons by adoption by Father God, should we not pay attention to His feasts? We need to know the signs and times. I write a lot about the signs as seen through the news. But the times were ordained by God long ago. We are exhorted to know them.

Camera and pen

The Fall Feasts: Rosh Hashanah

by Koinoia House

The Palestinian statehood vote at the United Nations may get slotted for either Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur, according to word that has reached Israel’s Foreign Ministry.  Placing the vote on either of these upcoming holidays would act as a way to get Israeli diplomats out of the room, unable to offer a final contrary opinion before ballot time.  As Itamar Eichner writes at Ynet News, "If the vote is held on Yom Kippur, there will not be a single Israeli diplomat at the UN."   The significance of a UN vote to create a Palestinian state on the Jewish new year will not be overlooked.
 
Jewish communities throughout the world will celebrate Rosh Hashanah as the sun sets Wednesday. Rosh Hashanah literally means "head of the year" and commemorates the anniversary of the creation of the world. It is celebrated on the first day of the month of Tishri, which this year starts at sundown on September 28th and ends on the 30th.

Israeli President Shimon Peres offered a Rosh Hashanah message on Tuesday, saying that he hoped the year 5722 would herald greater peace, security, and ecnomic hope.  "I extend my warm and best wishes to the Jewish people around the world for a year of peace, joy, good health and prosperity."

The commandment to observe Rosh Hashanah is found in Leviticus 23:23-25:

"And the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, ‘Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, In the seventh month, in the first day of the month, shall ye have a sabbath, a memorial of blowing of trumpets, an holy convocation. Ye shall do no servile work therein: but ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD.’"


A Yemeinte Jew blows a shofar in Jerusalem, circa 1935. Photo from Library of Congress collection.
It is also mentioned in Numbers 29:1: "And in the seventh month, on the first day of the month, ye shall have an holy convocation; ye shall do no servile work: it is a day of blowing the trumpets unto you."

One of the central features of Rosh Hashanah is the shofar. The shofar is an instrument made from a ram’s horn that sounds somewhat like a trumpet. In the Bible, Rosh Hashanah is referred to as Yom Teruah, the day of the sounding of the shofar, otherwise known as the Feast of Trumpets. The shofar is often representative of Abraham’s offering Isaac to God as a sacrifice on Mount Moriah (Genesis 22). It was then that God provided Abraham with a ram caught by its horns in a thicket as a substitute for Isaac.

Rosh Hashanah is a time of both celebration and repentance. It is a time of spiritual renewal through prayer and deep personal reflection leading up to Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, on the 10th day of Tishri (Leviticus 23:26-28). Rosh Hashanah is when the Jewish people recognize God as King and Judge over all living things. On Rosh Hashanah we celebrate the creation of the world, when "God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good," (Genesis 1:31).

The vast majority of Christians are unfamiliar with most of the traditional Jewish holidays. Yet they hold great spiritual and prophetic significance. In Colossians 2:16-17 Paul says, "Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days: which are a shadow of things to come.

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For more information about Rosh Hashanah or other Jewish holy days and their prophetic significance refer to our briefing The Feasts of Israel.

Rosh Hashanah is a time of forgiveness and new beginnings. Please take some time out of your week for serious introspection. Examine your heart before God and spend time in prayer.

May you be inscribed and sealed for a good year.

Related Links:

  •   The Feasts of Israel – Listen Free!
  •   The Feasts of Israel – MP3 Download
  •   Rosh Hashanah – Hebrew4Christians.com
  •   Will PA’s UN Vote Be Held On Rosh Hashana or Yom Kippur? – Ynet News
  •   Peres: New Year Is Time To ‘Seize Window of Opportunity’ – The Jewish Chronicle Online

Republished with permission

6 thoughts on “Happy New Year from Jerusalem

  1. ‘The Palestinian statehood vote at the United Nations may get slotted for either Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur, according to word that has reached Israel’s Foreign Ministry. Placing the vote on either of these upcoming holidays would act as a way to get Israeli diplomats out of the room, unable to offer a final contrary opinion before ballot time. As Itamar Eichner writes at Ynet News, “If the vote is held on Yom Kippur, there will not be a single Israeli diplomat at the UN.” The significance of a UN vote to create a Palestinian state on the Jewish new year will not be overlooked.’

    WOW, that would be totally underhanded.

  2. Awesome times! I just finished telling Buelita about your report on the Jewish new year, and we read the reference Numbers 29:1. We went further on talking about how man’s sins were covered by the blood of animals before and how Jesus Christ’s blood on the cross has redeemed us from our sins permanently. Buelita said, “Que Dios la
    bendiga siempre.”

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